Discrimination at work experienced by half of all LGBT employees

More than half of LGBT+ employees in the US have experienced or witnessed verbal discrimination against LGBT+ people while at work, according to a survey by Glassdoor.

The survey also found that nearly half of LGBT+ employees think that being fully out at work could hurt their career.



Around three in five (57 percent) of LGBT+ employees were out at work, but 43 percent said they were not “fully out.”

“It’s disheartening to see that a majority of LGBTQ employees have faced or witnessed some form of verbal discrimination at work,” said Jesus Suarez, Glassdoor’s LGBTQ and ally employee group leader.

The survey was carried out by The Harris Poll.

Around 70 percent of LGBT+ employees in the US would not apply to work at a company that does not support its LGBT+ employees, the survey found.

For comparison, 46 percent of employed Americans (LGBT+ and non-LGBT+) would not apply to work at a company that does not support its LGBT+ employees.

In US, 26 states offer no discrimination protection to LGBT employees

“Still today, 26 states do not protect LGBTQ employees at work and many of these employees believe coming out could hurt their career. This is a wake up call to employers and lawmakers,” said Suarez. “Many employers have an opportunity to build or strengthen the foundation for an inclusive culture that encourages employees to bring their full selves to work.”

Nearly seven in 10 of the LGBT+ employees surveyed said they thought their company could offer more support to LGBT+ people. And half of employed Americans (both LGBT+ and non-LGBT+) said they believe their companies can do better at supporting their LGBT+ employees.

“We’re seeing a strong majority of LGBTQ employees wanting more support from their employers, and there are many ways to offer support that go beyond benefits and policies,” said Suarez.

The survey was conducted online between April 26 and May 6, 2019. A total of 6,104 adults were surveyed, with 515 identifying as LGBT+.






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